Hacking the Future of Cooking

Hacking the Future of Cooking

Home cooks of the world rejoice: the future is going to make your kitchen a whole lot better. 

That is, if the teams competing in the “Future of Cooking” hackathon have anything to say about it. They spent a weekend at the FirstBuild makerspace and micro factory at the University of Louisville building pots that stir themselves and smart cooktops that give you step-by-step recipe instructions.

That second one is Sous Chef, a project conceived by U of L students. Sarah Morris, a senior at the J.B. Speed School of Engineering, said the competition gave her a chance to gain hands-on experience. 

“We got to come up with an idea for a product, and then see it through to the end,” said Morris, whose team won for the Best Simblee Connected project. 

The hackathon let each member of the team work outside his or her own area of expertise. They worked on everything from leveraging smart sensors, to creating marketing materials. 

“The atmosphere was great, the people were awesome, and I learned a lot at the end of it,” said John Le, a junior computer engineering and computer science major. “It was a time where makers, engineers, designers, and builders come together in one area to design and innovate the future of cooking.”

Morris got involved in the hackathon through past work with FirstBuild and its backer, GE Appliances, a Haier Company. She now has a job waiting for her at the latter after she graduates. 

"U of L is so closely tied with FirstBuild, it's a great opportunity to continue your hands-on work," she said. Students can go to the space and learn to use tools and equipment they one-day will use in their jobs. 

 

 

The atmosphere was great, the people were awesome, and I learned a lot at the end of it. It was a time where makers, engineers, designers, and builders come together in one area to design and innovate the future of cooking.
— John Le, a junior computer engineering and computer science major